I’m trying to squeeze in some “reviews” before we get too

I’m trying to squeeze in some “reviews” before we get too

3/3/2021, 10:04:12 PM
I’m trying to squeeze in some “reviews” before we get too far out from February, so here’s a mini stack of books I read last month. These aren’t really going to be proper reviews but rather just my quick thoughts on these books 😊 EVERY BODY LOOKING // Candice Iloh ( #gifted @penguinteen ) I’ve read a few novels written in verse now, and although this wasn’t my favorite, I enjoyed it. Even though I don’t have many shared experiences with Ada, the emotional journey of her story was incredibly relatable in terms of finding yourself outside of the confines of your upbringing. If you enjoy novels in verse, then one is definitely worth the read. DEATH IN HER HANDS // Ottessa Moshfegh Moshfegh has an undeniably unique voice that has the ability to fill you with discomfort and eerie familiarity. Death In Her Hands was so strange and not what I expected going into it but I love that it kept me guessing. Admittedly, this didn’t surpass My Year of Rest and Relaxation for me but now I’m eager to get to the rest of the her backlist. HONEY GIRL // Morgan Rogers ( #gifted @parkrowbooks ) If you’re looking for a standout romance, Honey Girl is your book! I didn’t think this book was going to hit me in the feels as hard as it did, but wow. I absolutely loved Grace and Yuki— individually and together. I related to Grace’s post-grad existential crisis SO MUCH! Also this book doesn’t just celebrate romantic love, but rather love in all its forms and relationships. I can’t recommend this book enough! TOKYO UENO STATION // Yu Miri This tiny gem packs such a big punch! Although our main character is a recently deceased homeless man, Kazu, this isn’t a ghost story. With every page, the power of the symbolism of Kazu’s presence in Ueno Park just hit harder and harder. As we are shown the dark pasts of Kazu and Ueno Park in tandem, this story truly highlights how a society can/does fail and discard those in the margins. If you’ve read any of these, I’d love to hear your thoughts on them!

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