Heyyyyyyyyyyyyy Henny, I finally finished Caste: The

Heyyyyyyyyyyyyy Henny, I finally finished Caste: The

8/6/2021, 10:23:20 PM
Heyyyyyyyyyyyyy Henny, I finally finished Caste: The Origins of Our Discontent by Isabel Wilkerson. Thank you @penguinrandomhouse #partner for sending me a Netgalley widget. Here is my review: Last night I attended an event that was held by The New York Public Library which hosted a conversation with Isabel Wilkerson to talk about her newest book “Caste: The Origins of Our Discontent.” Already finished with her book, I attended this event to help me group up my finals thoughts. During the event Wilkerson talks about how she doesn’t see this book as an argument but more as an “invitation to seeing ourselves differently than we have before and the idea that we can have new language to help us see ourselves differently.” This is exactly what Wilkerson does with her newest book “Caste: The Origins of Our Discontent.” Right from the first page, you are invited into this extraordinary book that challenges the reader to think differently and to see the world and most importantly this country through this new lens. Not knowing what caste was before, I came into this book blindly which can be a sort of a challenge because you are putting your trust in the writer way before you open the book. However, Wilkerson embraces the blind reader by defining this term and making sure that you understand this phenomenon that is embedded in American history to which has left this residue that is affecting American society even today. Wilkerson defines this caste system as, “an artificial construction, a fixed and embedded ranking of human value that sets the presumed supremacy of one group against the presumed inferiority of other groups on the basis of ancestry and often immutable traits.” Wilkerson doesn’t stop there though to make sure you know what this term is and what it has done. She uses these smart metaphors that only help the reader comprehend this term and its entirety. “Caste is the wordless usher in a darkened theater, flashlight cast down in the aisles, guiding us to our assigned seats for a performance.” Continued....

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