What is your favorite holiday (and is it your favorite to

What is your favorite holiday (and is it your favorite to

2/7/2021, 5:02:34 PM
What is your favorite holiday (and is it your favorite to read about?) For me it’s a toss up between New Year (Asian style) or Christmas, but I feel like I love READING about Halloween the most. That was one of the reasons why I loved “The Dreadful Tale of Prosper Redding”. It was witty and funny and steeped in Halloween. (It’s a middle-grade that I would definitely hand to any young reader.) . This week “The Last Life of Prince Alastor” released (thank you to @disneybooks for sending me this free copy with a matching @bookbeau ! A book and a matching book beau is my OTP) and I am so ready to finish where that shocker of an ending left me hanging in Prosper! This is the only Alex Bracken book that I have read, but it made me want to get into “The Darkest Minds”! (I tried “Passenger” but I couldn’t get into it at the time I started it and haven’t returned to it.) . I’ve got this on my TBR for either this month or March, and am looking forward to finishing this duology! . If you aren’t familiar with Prosper Redding, well… he has a demon living inside him. (From synopsis) “Turns out Prosper's great-great-great-great-great-something grandfather made — and then broke — a contract with a malefactor, a demon who exchanges fortune for eternal servitude. And, weirdly enough, four-thousand-year-old Alastor isn't exactly the forgiving type. The fiend has reawakened with one purpose — to destroy the family whose success he ensured and who then betrayed him. With only days to break the curse and banish Alastor back to the demon realm, Prosper is playing unwilling host to the fiend, who delights in tormenting him with nasty insults and constant attempts trick him into a contract. Yeah, Prosper will take his future without a side of eternal servitude, thanks. Little does Prosper know, the malefactor's control over his body grows stronger with each passing night, and there's a lot Alastor isn't telling his dim-witted (but admittedly strong-willed) human host.”

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