I don’t have any tattoos, but I’ve always known what I

I don’t have any tattoos, but I’ve always known what I

3/17/2021, 5:02:56 PM
I don’t have any tattoos, but I’ve always known what I would get if I did. I want a pirate ship in battle with a Kraken on my forearm. (It’s a long story I’ll have to share some time. Haha) But that’s the reason the cover of “The Sea Beast Takes a Lover” caught my eye. 😂😂🤷🏻‍♀️ it’s definitely my aesthetic. But can we just take a minute to talk about how weird and intriguing the synopsis is? (Synopsis below) “Just because Jenny was born without a head doesn’t mean she isn’t still annoying to her older brother...” 🤔 . This collection of short stories is going in my bag this week, so I’ll have it with me anywhere I go until I finish. It’s hard for me to read novels when I’m out because I feel like I never have enough time or attention to dig into a long plot line. But these all look about the right length for me to equally absorb and keep an eye on my little at the park etc. And it just sounds so different that I can’t wait to dive in. (Sea humor) . Thank you to @duttonbooks #prhpartner ) for sending me this copy. Tell me about the tattoos you have or would get. Anyone with Bookish inspired tattoos? . #theseabeasttakesalover #shortstories #amreading #michaelandreason Synopsis: Bewitching and playful, with its feet only slightly tethered to the world we know, The Sea Beast Takes a Lover explores hope, love, and loss across a series of surreal landscapes and wild metamorphoses. Just because Jenny was born without a head doesn’t mean she isn’t still annoying to her older brother, and just because the Man of the Future’s carefully planned extramarital affair ends in alien abduction and network fame doesn’t mean he can’t still pine for his absent wife. Romping through the fantastic with big-hearted ease, these stories cut to the core of what it means to navigate family, faith, and longing, whether in the form of a lovesick kraken slowly dragging a ship of sailors into the sea, a small town euthanizing its grandfathers in a time-honored ritual, or a third-grade field trip learning that time travel is even more wondrous–and more perilous–than they might imagine. Andreasen’s stories are simultaneously daring and deeply familiar

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