“A series of books, dilapidated and faded, sit bundled

“A series of books, dilapidated and faded, sit bundled

6/22/2021, 6:51:29 PM
“A series of books, dilapidated and faded, sit bundled together. Most of the bindings are separating from the yellowed pages, but each is at home in its battered state. Their wrinkled pages and discolored skin tell not of old age, but of a good life. These books, unlike so many others, were not just read, but revisited, loved, and experienced.” ― Kelseyleigh Reber, If I Resist . I was just telling my friend that I wanted a smokey smelling candle, and even though this “Aged Page” candle from @hearthandhammer @hearthandhammer lwood with cedar wood vanilla and clover leaf, it has this amazing mild smokey scent that I really love. I’ve actually retired all my other candles in favor of this one and the “Mad Girl’s Love Song” candle from Hearth and Hammer’s Sylvia Plath ODE box. Quite honestly my two favorite candles ever. (USE CODE: FPD10 for 10% off of @hearthandhammer website and Etsy shop) . "Old books have a distinctive smell that can make any book lover’s heart melt. Matija Strlic of University College London described it to The Telegraph as “a combination of grassy notes with a tang of acids and a hint of vanilla over an underlying mustiness, this unmistakable smell is as much a part of the book as its contents.” . . The secret to the scent is within the hundreds of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that make up the book’s paper pages, ink, and adhesive. Over time, the VOCs break down, releasing the chemicals into the air that are picked up by our noses. New books also have a trademark aroma, but it isn’t quite as developed as their older counterparts. Additionally, different materials used in manufacturing the book will alter the VOC profile.” . So there you go. . Are you a book page smeller?

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