“Sometimes you have to get lost to find yourself” -Wildman

“Sometimes you have to get lost to find yourself” -Wildman

6/9/2021, 4:09:07 PM
“Sometimes you have to get lost to find yourself” -Wildman . This quote is so true in my life, and is actually part of the reason I am interested in reading @j .c.geiger’s debut novel “Wildman”. . I was actually just thinking about this the other day—how the second I moved out for the first time at 18 really started me on a journey to find out who I was on my own, rather than what I had become under the expectations and rules that come with youth. In truth, I found that I was mostly the same person, but I found the confidence to be that person unapologetically and become a better version of myself. . Today I’ve partnered with @disneybooks to celebrate the release of Wildman, which hit shelves on June 6th! . If you could take a road trip anywhere, who would you want to bring along? After BEA and BookCon, I wish that we could rent a giant giant bus and get everyone from Bookstagram on it and we just road trip around to book signings together. haha. . #wildmanroadtrip Synopsis: How can a total stranger understand you better than the people you’ve known your entire life? When Lance’s ’93 Buick breaks down in the middle of nowhere, he tells himself Don’t panic. After all, he’s valedictorian of his class. First-chair trumpet player. Scholarship winner. Nothing can stop Lance Hendricks. But the locals don’t know that. They don’t even know his name. Stuck in a small town, Lance could be anyone: a delinquent, a traveler, a maniac. One of the townies calls him Wildman, and a new world opens up. He’s ordering drinks at a roadhouse. Jumping a train. Talking to an intriguing older girl who is asking about his future. And what he really wants. As one day blurs into the next, Lance finds himself drifting farther from home and closer to a girl who makes him feel a way he’s never felt before—like himself. This debut novel by a remarkable new talent explores the relationship between identity and place, the power of being seen, and the speed at which a well-planned life can change forever.

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