"I learned firsthand back in 1980 about America’s proud

"I learned firsthand back in 1980 about America’s proud

1/30/2021, 1:17:08 PM
"I learned firsthand back in 1980 about America’s proud tradition of welcoming refugees, when my family fled war and persecution in my native country of Afghanistan and resettled in the U.S. as political refugees. Today, I am deeply disturbed by the U.S. government’s divisive executive order to deny so many families, most even more desperate than my own, the same opportunity I was given. As a Muslim-American, it disturbs and offends me greatly that the U.S. would apply an apparent religious test to refugees and migrants, placing under special suspicion Muslim families, most of whom are women and children escaping years of atrocity and unspeakable suffering. This is antithetical to everything I have taught my children since they were born: that America was built on principles of tolerance and justice, and that it opened its doors to people who were fleeing persecution and terror regardless of what faith they practiced. The executive order signed this week (and on Holocaust Remembrance day, no less) not only flies in the face of the very same principles on which this nation was built, it turns its back to some of the world’s most vulnerable people. Who can possibly forget Alan Kurdi, the three-year-old Syrian refugee boy whose tiny body washed up on a beach in Turkey in 2015? I am further saddened that this comes at a time when the needs of refugees and migrants have never been more urgent. We are in the midst of a global displacement crisis. It is a time for compassion and solidarity, not divisive policy that undermines core American values. It is my hope that the U.S. will resume its longstanding resettlement program and provide leadership, protection, and equal treatment to refugees and migrants regardless of what nation they come from or what faith they practice." -Khaled Hosseini | 📷: @hannahrdeveyra

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